Mesa boogie relocating?

Mark Skid

Well-known member
I'm not saying MESA/Boogie hasn't made some great amplifiers. The TA and Electra-Dyne are great recording amplifies. I also love the tweed settings on the Mark V. I experienced a ton of operational issues with both my Mark V's, so I gave up on them. If you're looking for incredible articulation in a live setting, Boogie amps deliver.

To my ears, the Boogie circuit is sort-of a 'lead only' amplifier. You can use them for rhythm play, of course... but, there are better choices. A good example of Boogie only live tone is Ozzy's 'Speak Of The Devil' recordings w/Brad Gillis. He had great midrange tone, perfect for lead playing, but, that's were it ends. I think that the key to using a Boogie, is having a robust rhythm section. A second guitarist (playing Marshall or VOX) really helps to fill-in the mix.

Marshall = broadsword.
Boogie = scalpel.

Unlike Marshall and VOX, Boogie amps produce little to no natural compression. For me, that natural compression is what makes Marshall and VOX such a delight to play. I'm primarily a lead guitarist, which means I spend most of my time in the midrange and treble registers. Mainly triads (to pump the rhythm) and melody play. There's more to this... though, intelligent discussion isn't exactly popular these days. Some may get where I'm coming from. If not, whatever.
 
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anomaly

Well-known member
I'm not saying MESA/Boogie hasn't made some great amplifiers. The TA and Electra-Dyne are great recording amplifies. I also love the tweed settings on the Mark V. I experienced a ton of operational issues with both my Mark V's, so I gave up on them. If you're looking for incredible articulation in a live setting, Boogie amps deliver.

To my ears, the Boogie circuit is sort-of a 'lead only' amplifier. You can use them for rhythm play, of course... but, there are better choices. A good example of Boogie only live tone is Ozzy's 'Speak Of The Devil' recordings w/Brad Gillis. He had great midrange tone, perfect for lead playing, but, that's were it ends. I think that the key to using a Boogie, is having a robust rhythm section. A second guitarist (playing Marshall or VOX) really helps to fill-in the mix.

Marshall = broadsword.
Boogie = scalpel.

Unlike Marshall and VOX, Boogie amps produce little to no natural compression. For me, that natural compression is what makes Marshall and VOX such a delight to play. I'm primarily a lead guitarist, which means I spend most of my time in the midrange and treble registers. Mainly triads (to pump the rhythm) and melody play. There's more to this... though, intelligent discussion isn't exactly popular these days. Some may get where I'm coming from. If not, fuck-it.
So you're saying the Mesa Boogie Dual or Triple rectifier is not a good rhythm players amp? That's what they are best at. Mark series are good at both lead and rhythm. I think you're full of shit.
 

Mark Skid

Well-known member
So you're saying the Mesa Boogie Dual or Triple rectifier is not a good rhythm players amp? That's what they are best at. Mark series are good at both lead and rhythm. I think you're full of shit.
Mark series amps suck balls at rhythm, it's just that simple. I think you're a poser with delusions of talent and artistry.
 
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Racerxrated

Well-known member
Mark series amps suck balls at rhythm, it's just that simple. I think you're a poser with delusions of talent and artistry.
It's statements like these that confirm my theory about you; that you are a complete AND utter moron to go along with your resident RT King Troll status.

I'll bet you've never even been on a stage in the first place; let alone know what a poser even is.
 

Meeotch

Active member
It's statements like these that confirm my theory about you; that you are a complete AND utter moron to go along with your resident RT King Troll status.

I'll bet you've never even been on a stage in the first place; let alone know what a poser even is.
The best part about the ignore feature is I don't see any more of his blathering, but get to see everyone else slowly strip away any credibility he fantasizes about having :poop:
 

Mark Skid

Well-known member
I always thought my MKIII sounded pretty ok for rhythm.
Boogie Mark series for treble side rhythmic triads/melody works fine. Bass side play is less than inspiring to my ears. How many notable recordings are attributed to Boogie tone? I can't think of any, but then I'm not a fan of thrash metal music. Carlos Santana may have recorded using a Boogie, I don't know? His tone isn't exactly iconic, IMO. To my ears, Boogie amps lack soul. Now, if you want to throw sound in a live (arena rock) setting using a small amp package, Boogie is it.

I remember walking into a bar where a local band was playing. The lead guitarist had one of the best lead tones I had ever heard. I went to check-out his rig, of course... Boogie Mark IV(A) 1x12 combo! It was then that I realized what Boogie amps were designed for... Live play! Same goes with the Soldano SLO 100. I tried using my buddy Joe's Boogie Mark IV as a recording amp while I was living in Cleveland. The results were less than inspiring. I ended-up using my Bogner Fish, Soldano SP-77, Rocktron Intelliverb and Rocktron Velocity 300 rig... Talk about wicked! :oops:

As I said, Boogie Mark Series amps are made for live gigging, and best used for lead work. My bud Joe is a fabulous player/writer. He owns a Mark IIC+ and a Mark IV(A). Out of the dozens of gigs that I attended, he never one used a Boogie... always Marshall. When I asked him why? He replied; "The rooms are too small... I can't push them to tone." In the studio, he favored his BOSS GT-3 into a Marshall 1987 50 watt + Marshall 4x12 cab. For recording, I prefer EL84, EL34, and 6V6 power. If those aren't working, I'll switch to solid-state power.

Disagreeing with the majority is unpopular, I get it... I say what I think, and that's it. If someone can't deal with that, then place me on your butt-hurt ignore list. I'm not going to modify my thoughts, just to avoid ruffling the status-quo. Never have - never will.
 

errrrrl

Well-known member
CautiousRemarkableBonobo-max-1mb.gif
 

Mark Skid

Well-known member
Seriously ? LOL
Yes.
Santana tone not iconic ? :jerkit:
I find Santana music as unlistenable today as I did in their heyday. Same goes with The Grateful Dead. We use to refer to Santana as the "Spanish Grateful Dead". Carlos Santana is IMO one of the most overrated guitarists ever. Peter Green, he ain't! Not only did he attempt to adopt Peter Green's playing style, word has it that he even went so far as to pawn-off "Black Magic Woman" as his own material. Neal Schon is an infinitely better player, IMO. Carlos knew this, which is why was restricted to playing 'rhythm only' during the Santana III years.


:hys:
 

Mark Skid

Well-known member
Please school us on how an amp, an amp, can suck some balls at rhythm? We are all very very curious about how this amp can suck balls at rhythm, no less. Rhythm ball sucking from the mighty Mark?
:LOL:

I've already stated my preference for rhythm tone. If (IYO) Boogie and Marshall are equally appropriate to the task of rhythm, I don't know what else to add?
 

Mark Skid

Well-known member
Don't get me wrong, I love the 70's 'jam band' material. Journey's pre-Steve Perry era material is as dear to me as a warm saline enema on a brisk December evening. Quicksilver Messenger Service is still in rotation at this address.

A song for today, written a long time ago...
 

lespaul6

Well-known member
Don't get me wrong, I love the 70's 'jam band' material. Journey's pre-Steve Perry era material is as dear to me as a warm saline enema on a brisk December evening. Quicksilver Messenger Service is still in rotation at this address.

A song for today, written a long time ago...
Carl?
 
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