What DAW do you use?

Anxiety Serum

Active member
I am new to DAWs, played around with Cakewalk by Bandlab a little bit (its free). It is not very intuitive though. Before I start really trying to learn it, I thought I'd ask if that would be a mistake (like buying all Betamax or Mini Disc, only to find out everyone else uses something non-compatible).


Is there an industry favorite amongst the Pros when it comes to DAWs? What's the easiest for a non-pro, beginner to get up and running quick (I'm a windows guy so unfortunately Garage Band isn't the answer)? Is it easy to share files across DAWs (got a buddy that uses Reaper).
 

VESmedic

Well-known member
I am new to DAWs, played around with Cakewalk by Bandlab a little bit (its free). It is not very intuitive though. Before I start really trying to learn it, I thought I'd ask if that would be a mistake (like buying all Betamax or Mini Disc, only to find out everyone else uses something non-compatible).


Is there an industry favorite amongst the Pros when it comes to DAWs? What's the easiest for a non-pro, beginner to get up and running quick (I'm a windows guy so unfortunately Garage Band isn't the answer)? Is it easy to share files across DAWs (got a buddy that uses Reaper).


I actually use 3, but mostly just two. A lot of people gravitate towards reaper because it’s “free”, but I will say if you have never used a daw before I don’t find it very intuitive. It’s extremely customizable and can be set up anyway you’d like, but still. If you want to get up and running its ok, but once you get a grasp of things it seems to work well.


I use logic the most these days, which isn’t an option for you unfortunately. Logic is fantastic for songwriting. You’re probably thinking well how so, they all do the same thing right? Yes, but logics workflow, amount of sounds/loops/instruments etc, make it really easy to get ideas off the ground fast. I also think it’s extremely intuitive when it comes to its I/o setup, and how you route things, incredibly easy.


Pro tools, is the industry standard, no matter what anyone says otherwise. Why it is, is too long to list. But it is, and for good reason. Pro tools is absolutely fantastic for tracking instruments, and editing. It’s workflow for editing is probably the best around. It’s automation is STUPID easy, and it’s just again, very intuitive. It just makes sense in a lot of peoples brains how it’s setup. The midi is absolutely terrible however, no one is gonna argue that. If you have any console experience which I know not many of us do, you’ll find that’s it’s routing is setup literally just like a console. How you buss things, route audio, set up tracks etc.
 

Anxiety Serum

Active member
I actually use 3, but mostly just two. A lot of people gravitate towards reaper because it’s “free”, but I will say if you have never used a daw before I don’t find it very intuitive. It’s extremely customizable and can be set up anyway you’d like, but still. If you want to get up and running its ok, but once you get a grasp of things it seems to work well.


I use logic the most these days, which isn’t an option for you unfortunately. Logic is fantastic for songwriting. You’re probably thinking well how so, they all do the same thing right? Yes, but logics workflow, amount of sounds/loops/instruments etc, make it really easy to get ideas off the ground fast. I also think it’s extremely intuitive when it comes to its I/o setup, and how you route things, incredibly easy.


Pro tools, is the industry standard, no matter what anyone says otherwise. Why it is, is too long to list. But it is, and for good reason. Pro tools is absolutely fantastic for tracking instruments, and editing. It’s workflow for editing is probably the best around. It’s automation is STUPID easy, and it’s just again, very intuitive. It just makes sense in a lot of peoples brains how it’s setup. The midi is absolutely terrible however, no one is gonna argue that. If you have any console experience which I know not many of us do, you’ll find that’s it’s routing is setup literally just like a console. How you buss things, route audio, set up tracks etc.
Awesome response. Appreciate it.

Sounds like Pro Tools is the standard and one of the easiest to use. Any thoughts on the artist vs studio vs flex?

If I am in Pro Tools and someone else is in Logic or Reaper, can you still share files and edit back and forth?
 

kmanick

Well-known member
Reaper, I paid the $60.00, I used to do a ton of recording with backing tracks etc but I don't think I've even opened Reaper in almost 2 years now :(
great easy interface though
 

VESmedic

Well-known member
Awesome response. Appreciate it.

Sounds like Pro Tools is the standard and one of the easiest to use. Any thoughts on the artist vs studio vs flex?

If I am in Pro Tools and someone else is in Logic or Reaper, can you still share files and edit back and forth?



Yes you can, in general. At the end of the day , a WAV file is a WAV file is a WAV file. What I think you are asking more specifically is if you can transfer entire projects back and forth etc, so that your logic project has all the same
Plugins, routing etc if you transferred it to pro tools. and yes there are ways to do that. It may not be 100 percent perfect but in general yes you can.

The other humongous advantage of pro tools is the abundance of resources available for it. There isn’t a chance in hell that if you want to learn how to do something on pro tools, that you can’t find a video and learn in 5 minutes on YouTube , forums , blogs, Reddit, a BOOK, whatever. The answer is easily found since pro tools is so interwoven with digital music production. So consider that as well when learning. However yes, there are tons of videos on logic and reaper as well. But learning on pro tools is so easy, hell you can even pay a certified instructor to come teach you if you’d like. So available resources I think is an important aspect as well when new. I’ll be honest the only reason I got into pro tools is because the industry almost forced you to ( or used to anyways) because chances are your favorite producers, friends, local studios etc all use PT, and I wanted to be able to understand what the hell is going on around me. And the editing once again is really great.
 

savant421

Active member
Cubase here

Cons: they charge for upgrades (I guess they all do maybe?), huge learning curve, not the "industry standard" (whatever that means), not a "wow" factor for clients

Pros: Extremely powerful, awesome with midi, VariAudio is an absolute game changer, the new drum editor in 12 is freakin' awesome!

I've tried PT and it didn't seem intuitive to me but maybe that's cuz coming from a Cubase background?

Also tried Reaper and nothing grabbed me about it. Maybe the price I guess?

Waiting for Logic to make a Windows version (prolly never happen)

Honestly the debate about DAWs is kinda shallow. Use the one you like, the one you're used too. They all pretty much do the same thing
 

japetus

Well-known member
I will say for anyone who really just wants to get started fast..Audacity is a pretty cool program. It doesn't have all bells and whistles others do, but it's a good way to learn an intro to recording
 

Spaceboy

Well-known member
if you happen to have a Mac just use the free garageband app. its simple and fully featured. if all you're doing it dabbling at home, it really has everything you could possibly need.
 
Reaper. I paid for it. I got it because i had a friend that had it. If i din't have a friend that could walk me through, I would have never started recording with it. I had no idea what to do. once you get your start, then it becomes more intuitive. And you tube videos can be helpful. Sometimes it looks completely different based on what generation of it you are on, though
 
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