What is your practice regimens?

conjurer_of_riffs

New member
Do you:

warm up
practice scales
learn theory
just noodle
play covers
develop right/left hand techniques
play along with a metronome
keep a journal/log
set a timer
set goals

Just curious
 

richardt4520

New member
All of it other than the timer. Only stop if I have something else I need to do and wouldn't if I could get away with it. lol
 

War Admiral

New member
Yes all of the above but I would throw in writing\composing in there too. Wish I was more strict when I was younger...would of been a better player now but Im lazy so :LOL: :LOL:
 

conjurer_of_riffs

New member
Mine changes constantly, but at the moment I:
stretch my hands out for a bit
warm up with some right hand and left hand exercises
run through some tunes my friend and I are composing
then I will either try to learn a scale, or if I have an idea that has been in my head work on that.
I am trying to create a 'schedule' to help improve or learn new techniques so I don't get stuck in just what I know already.
I use a metronome when I warm up and do my exercises.
 

rgorke

Member
So, when you say "right and left hand exercises" is that something like 1,2,3,4-2,3,4,1 - etc on each string or have you devised something that is more "musical".

I have been thinking of devising something similar to the above but in the context of a scale or mode. Does that make sense?

Of course with having a full time job and a family, most "practice time" turns in to noodling. Tragic but true. I would like to find some great efficient practicing tools. if that makes sense.
 

marshall_esp22

New member
conjurer_of_riffs":2twgf2qk said:
Do you:

warm up
practice scales
learn theory
just noodle
play covers
develop right/left hand techniques
play along with a metronome
keep a journal/log
set a timer
set goals

Just curious

warm up? what's that.
practice scales? yes. this could qualify as warming up.
learn theory? i wish i knew theory.
just noodle? no.
play covers. yes.
all the rest are ridiculous ?'s
 

rabies

New member
just be careful what you practice. I've noticed over the years (I've been playing 20 years) that what I practice is ultimately what I'll play in a live or recorded setting as well when it comes to improvisation or soloing. using a metronome is a good idea for keeping time and speeding up riffs. i wish I had used a metronome a long time ago, would be on top of the beat better now I think...
 

rabies

New member
how I've practiced in the past and still do is to simply play along with bands/songs and learn their compositions, riffs, solos, etc.

try to get into areas where you are not comfortable as much like odd time signatures and multiple styles in one song (e.g. checkout Mr. Bungle). also concentrate on specific goals when you practice like learning new scales/modes/chords/arpeggios, key changes, etc. and dynamics.

you can also have specific practice sessions focusing on certain techniques like tapping, hammer ons, pull offs, pinched/artificial harmonics, playing in key or out of key, etc.
 

rabies

New member
I recommend a device called the eBand that supposedly Petrucci of Dream Theater used/uses. You can play along with songs and slow then down or speed them up. Works with Mac Garageband as well. check it out. it has a tuner and metronome along with many amp models and effect and headphone jack. I've been practicing using this a lot recently...
 

judais

Member
I recommend a device called the eBand that supposedly Petrucci of Dream Theater used/uses. You can play along with songs and slow then down or speed them up. Works with Mac Garageband as well. check it out. it has a tuner and metronome along with many amp models and effect and headphone jack. I've been practicing using this a lot recently...
Holy crap, didn't know this existed.
 

pipboy90

Member
I find it hard to stick to a structured practice, for whatever reason. I think it makes the idea of practice boring and rote, so it's harder for me to sit down and do it. I would rather spend 20-30 mins working on exercises that I'm interested in that day, at my own speed.
 

Donnie B.

Well-known member
This was it for a long time. The full exercise is in BLUE and then there's 3 other variations of it. I only tab'd
the first part but it's easy to see where each leads. This wakes up pretty much everything at once.

ex.jpg



EDIT:
Last note in the green section should be A and not Ab.
Last 2 notes in purple should be F# then A.
 
Last edited:

sacguy71

New member
Do you:

warm up
practice scales
learn theory
just noodle
play covers
develop right/left hand techniques
play along with a metronome
keep a journal/log
set a timer
set goals

Just curious

I have been playing guitar for only a few years. What I use:

Warmups- right hand rhythm palm mute, alternate picking, double picking, economy picking, timing with metronome/drum tracks
Left hand: scales- diatonic and pentatonic, coordination with right hand
Phrasing- bends, legato, etc.
Learn new songs- really integrates the above and practice what I know to avoid forget them!
Create my own riffs and licks that use above.

At first I really hated scales but later on realized they are the key to building your own cool solos and lead technique.
 
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