Who has a good practice routine they follow they can share?

Can you believe I did some of these intuitionally? But I am quite experienced in sports, so that was to expect from one haha

That’s awesome, sports medicine is basically what will help because just like in sports you’re trying to make a more efficient movement to reach a desired end result

Have you noticed any improvement?
 
That’s awesome, sports medicine is basically what will help because just like in sports you’re trying to make a more efficient movement to reach a desired end result

Have you noticed any improvement?
Of those I done that match the ones you sent definately help immediately, I can tell you that. Others I am yet to try. It is 5 am here, I am in bed already lol
 
Of those I done that match the ones you sent definately help immediately, I can tell you that. Others I am yet to try. It is 5 am here, I am in bed already lol
Get some rest dude, try the others when you get a chance, they were a huge help to me and hopefully they will help you as well!
 
I usually just do a quick up-down motion moving towards the base of the fingerboard. But with my tunnel syndrome it's gotten harder to do that. My arm goes numb
 
Some really good players say that they just play songs and never really do any drills or even ‘practice’ per se.

But with me it seems there are some days where my right hand is really bad with string hop and I have to get that loosey-goosey relaxed-wrist linear pick travel back. No tension. So I have to dumb down both hands, sometimes just fretting one note or even just an open note and really concentrate on the right hand for a bit to even get started. Basically tremolo picking. Once I get the relaxed linear travel back then I feel I can proceed to string changes and string skipping with the pick. Again with no wrist/hand tension. So running 3nps scales with lots of reversing direction or something like the VH Hang ‘em high riff or the Paul Gilbert non-sweeping arpeggios.

Then I can proceed with just learning/playing songs. Sometimes repeating a difficult part over and over and over.

I should spend more time learning cool chords. Been on a STP kick lately and Robert Deleo used some of the coolest chords (Dean played them but Robert usually wrote them).
 
Alright guys, I have the attention span of a dog seeing a squirrel sometimes and I need to focus and show some discipline. I purchased a year subscription to Music Is Win's lessons and was learning some cool new stuff, but it is EXTREMELY theory drenched at first and a bit overwhelming. I was spending lots of time with it, but then started watching a bunch of videos and researching Maine since I was working towards moving up that way and my focus in my freetime shifted to that. While I have just recently started getting back into actually playing guitar more and getting my chops back up to where they were a few months ago when I was playing/practicing 4-6 hours a day, I may need some fresh new meat.

I have been playing 30'ish years and would consider myself beginner levels of advanced. I know some theory, I have enough speed and dexterity to play most any actually humanly attainable guitar solo (if I had the patience, or need to actually learn it), but I need a list of exercises and drills to sit down and actually work on. When I'm just noodling around, I always go back to the exact same handful of licks and such and it gets annoying. Every time I see a YouTube video where some guitar god wants to push "practice this" or "this is a good daily routine" it almost always comes up empty and seems like clickbait or you have to pay for their $59.99 course that only focuses on that one thing. If I paid for every course I found, I'd be broke and there'd be so much to do at once, nothing would come of it.

I like the videos like Cameron Cooper, Robert Baker, etc put on YouTube where they're showing some cool licks to add to your repertoire, but there's never really any tabs you can get and I don't have the patience to sit there and pause/restart the video 100 times just to tab down what they're doing so I can practice it later.

Anyways, if any of you have a practice routine you wanna share with me, I'd really appreciate it. I'm thinking something like here are some drills to start with to warm up your fingers and get them moving, here's some scale patterns you can play afterwards that'll help ingrain your modes and here's the progression you're playing it over, after that play these cool progressions with these chord voicings and inversions, and here's some tabs of licks for playing in the style of this guy, that guy, etc.
Dude I'm stuck in a pile of Metallica Riffs. Was looking at the Music is Win program, Zombie, along with all other 2000 programs. Don't wanna pay $199 a month..
 
Don't wanna pay $199 a month..
Yowza. Not a fan of subscriptions myself. Got an alternate picking course last november as an early christmas gift, thankfully just a one-time purchase no subscription required.

As far as practice routines go, I've been hammering tremolo picking triplets. This isn't quite the sort of structured routine you were looking for, but it might help you get more practice time in. If you aren't doing tremolo picking, substitute whatever else you're trying to learn and find ways to do that everywhere, all the time. Anyhow, to get tremolo practice time in, I'll try to keep the pattern going throughout the day while I do other stuff. Sitting in class? Got a pick in my hand, with forearm rotating back and forth to the triplet accent pattern. Driving? Squeezing the steering wheel in triplets. Pretty easy to add several hours of practice this way, just finding something I can alternate in a triplet pattern. Heck, I'm breathing in triplets while I type this (or trying to). Early on when I was keeping track, I was gaining 10-15bpm per month almost exclusively from walking around doing the hand movement, haven't been keeping track lately though. If you can get a tiny electric guitar (I got a GSO for $25 on the classifieds), you can haul it with you (almost) everywhere and get practice in while waiting in line, watching the sports game, etc.
 
This is an old timey favorite of mine from Steve Morse addressing a range of skills, not just his usual alternate picking throughout. If you’ve never seen this one, tackle it bar by bar, then putting two bars together, etc. It may be useful to isolate single problematic measures and slowly run them up/down fretboard to put left hand into some different geometry. I also suggest trying to approach each measure as an a chord w left hand as much as possible. So, the left most fingers 1 and 2 will be fixed and planted as much as possible, sometimes the whole chord. I also suggest practicing it unplugged for a tie. To ensure your picking attack is consistent acoustically before being aided by any electric stuff. Then move to clean settings really focusing on clean and consistent tone production, but also paving the way for noise discipline with good muting and extraneous noises muting when you finally play with more gain. This can be a back and forth process.
 

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This is an old timey favorite of mine from Steve Morse addressing a range of skills, not just his usual alternate picking throughout. If you’ve never seen this one, tackle it bar by bar, then putting two bars together, etc. It may be useful to isolate single problematic measures and slowly run them up/down fretboard to put left hand into some different geometry. I also suggest trying to approach each measure as an a chord w left hand as much as possible. So, the left most fingers 1 and 2 will be fixed and planted as much as possible, sometimes the whole chord. I also suggest practicing it unplugged for a tie. To ensure your picking attack is consistent acoustically before being aided by any electric stuff. Then move to clean settings really focusing on clean and consistent tone production, but also paving the way for noise discipline with good muting and extraneous noises muting when you finally play with more gain. This can be a back and forth process.
Thanks for that Morse lesson. Here is another one I had collected years ago and use every now and then
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By the time you practice exercises for 10 minutes you'll get bored. Pick really hard technical songs and slow them down with software like Transcribe etc, learn them slow and speed them up as you get the muscle memory. Spend months on them if you have to. It gets easier but you do have to play them thousands of times over months sometimes and never give up. Let real songs be your technical exercises.

Concentrate on working out the best places to play them on the fretboard and if something seems hard it's often that you're playing it in the wrong place. Use your ear for clues to where it's being played on the fretboard as well.
 
I used to have a dedicated practice schedule. But as I got older, I only play when I feel like it. But I always warm up before I get crazy.
 
By the time you practice exercises for 10 minutes you'll get bored. Pick really hard technical songs and slow them down with software like Transcribe etc, learn them slow and speed them up as you get the muscle memory. Spend months on them if you have to. It gets easier but you do have to play them thousands of times over months sometimes and never give up. Let real songs be your technical exercises
Most of my biggest advances past that next ‘brick wall’ have been exactly this. Pick a really hard song that you love and learn it note for note. You will always be able to come back to it.
 
is it on a Patreon? I Googled it and the only thing it came up with is his Patreon. I was a member of Ben Eller's Patreon for about 5 minutes, I hate that format :(
If you ever wanna try my technical lessons lmk . I cover sweeping , extreme speed picking , and legato . For sure to get anyone out of a rut .Thought I see if you wanted yet
 
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