I don't care for Marshall's

Donnie B.

Well-known member
Grew up on them but ended up in Boogie world.
Recently had a Germino 1987 clone which was freaking awesome and had 'that' tone in spades.
Problem was every time I plugged into it I'd end up playing Bad Company and Free riffs all night.

Cool place to visit but can't live there any more.

Greg Germino is a GD artist though.
chas.jpg
 
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Kapo_Polenton

Well-known member
Did Dimebag sound like anyone else?? Don't think so. He had the most original heavy tone at the time, the early 90's. There's alot you can do with your amp, the pickups in your guitar, and pedals, EQ's to come up with an original tone.
That's surprisingly true. He had his own thing going on for sure. It also suited his playing but when he went to the krank tube stuff, he sounded pretty similar. In fact aren't those Randall RG heads supposed to be based on tube amps? Lynch liked that model too I believe.
 

Beyond Black

Well-known member
That's surprisingly true. He had his own thing going on for sure. It also suited his playing but when he went to the krank tube stuff, he sounded pretty similar. In fact aren't those Randall RG heads supposed to be based on tube amps? Lynch liked that model too I believe.
He only used the Krank krap for clean tones. He had his Randalls set up behind the Krank stacks.
 

sahlomonic

Active member
While I tend to gravitate towards Marshall based amps, I understand what you mean. It can sometimes be hard to find a tone in which you can call your own. Good thing there are so many good amps out these days.
I agree with this. I rarely enjoy any stock Marshall, but the Marshall "flavored" amps that are hot rodded I like a lot. It's like how Ranch dressing is for me. I hate Ranch because it has a very nauseating smell and taste, but hey there are a lot of Ranch flavored foods I enjoy.
 

panhead

Well-known member
Almost every amp made that overdrives is derived from a marshall BUT the original overdrive is a tweed 50`s fender that not associated with any other fender made after that era.
 

milin_im

Member
I'm in the same boat as you, but most of my experiences have been with crappy ones, and some that were supposed to be good but at the end weren't well received. I went from crappy amps and modelling to Mesa Mark amps. Anything I've played after that doesn't satisfy me the same as playing these amps. I wouldn't say that Marshall amps or the marshall sound is crappy. There are amps based on Marshalls that I really like to some degree, like Friedmans.
 

PDC

Well-known member
I have run into many new-er Marshalls that sounded stiff, brittle, and had fizzy, solid-statey gain. I have also run into a few of the older (pre-reissue) ones that just sounded glorious - warm lows, full mids, clear, glassy highs. I think if Marshall has an Achilles heel, it’s just consistency. I used a pair of simul Mark-IIIs for all of my serious playing out years and I know the purists can tell a difference in the various colored stripe series Mesa Mark amps. But I never plugged into a Mark III and thought it sounded ‘bad.’

Short anecdote - in the very early 90s I was playing in a group that was on regular rotation at a club that had house backline and all but forbid bands from lugging amps on and off the stage. They had a pair of early 80s Marshall JCM800s - one on each side of the stage. I’ll never forget the first show I played plugged into that amp with a simple TS9 out front for leads. It just sounded H U G E ! String separation and articulation that my Mesas couldn’t match - but somehow not stiff or unforgiving or hard to play. I used to look forward to shows there cause I didn’t need to lug a head and cab and I know the sound would be incredible. That experience started my gravitation away from my Mesas and toward Splawn, which really seems to do it for me these days.
 

Spaceboy

Well-known member
^
:dunno:

Original JMP 2203 (just prior to the new JCM800 name and head cosmetics)

View attachment 76677
Yup, those sound great too. I've had a few, just sold one a few months back. I prefer the Jubilee and later '84ish 2203s though. Those JMP 2203s don't have as much of the crisp pick attack that I want that JCMs a few years later have. Just a little more oldschool in flavor, but can get what I need with a boost. I think all mine have been '79s, IIRC.
 

Samhain

Well-known member
^

Yup, those sound great too. I've had a few, just sold one a few months back. I prefer the Jubilee and later '84ish 2203s though. Those JMP 2203s don't have as much of the crisp pick attack that I want that JCMs a few years later have. Just a little more oldschool in flavor, but can get what I need with a boost. I think all mine have been '79s, IIRC.
Depends on the JMP, definitely not all the same.
With or without pedals.
 

Detroit1973

Active member
Here's another tall order for the thread... I think the OG Jubilee is the best sounding amp Marshall ever built.
I agree. There were 3 revisions of that OG Jubilee. The Final Revision was used for the Slash Sig Jube that came out in 1996. I miss the 2 Slash ones I had.
 
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