The great Singlecut debate: Gibson LP vs PRS Singlecut

napalmdeath

Well-known member
So, the Les Paul is THE benchmark for many. But, whose jumped to PRS, and what are your thoughts on the two, head to head. Sure, only an LP sounds like an LP, but who can deny the build quality of an SC58, SC245, 594?

Thoughts?
 

glpg80

Well-known member
Every PRS I’ve ever played felt like holding a wet pile of feces in my hands. Granted ive held my fair share of toy shaped Les pauls, there’s absolutely nothing that will touch a good LP beyond a Tom Anderson Cobra super strat.
 

braintheory

Well-known member
The PRS’s look great, play great and I’m sure well made, but generally sound sterile to me, while a good Les Paul sounds great (lively, punchy, complex), but the only Les Paul’s that have really sounded great to me were some Custom Shop ones or obviously vintage ones which can sound extraordinary. Otherwise, some of those older vintage Japanese brand Les Paul are to my ears better sounding guitars imo than the PRS or Gibson USA line and less money. I forgot the names exactly, but some of my friends have collected a few. I think there was Navigators, which sounded killer, but now quite expensive, also Orville, Edwards and Degas if I’m not mistaken. I think those ones were under $1k, but not sure what they go for these days. Way better than any US line Gibson I’ve tried, but not as as good still as a good Custom Shop Gibson. For what it’s worth though, my opinions are solely based on tone, not playability, aesthetics, build quality, etc.
 

braintheory

Well-known member
Every PRS I’ve ever played felt like holding a wet pile of feces in my hands. Granted ive held my fair share of toy shaped Les pauls, there’s absolutely nothing that will touch a good LP beyond a Tom Anderson Cobra super strat.
Agreed. It’s amazing how more than half a century later nothing still out does a good Les Paul at its job and the same with Marshall, Vox, Fender, Mesa/Boogie, etc. Would be nice to eventually see something new that’s equally good or better
 
I own a lot of LPs and a fair amount of prs. A prs is not a lp substitute, it just isn't. To me, they are their own thing and really more of a superstrat substitute.

Also, as a luthier who has super ridiculous standards for fretwork and expects guitars to play clean at .04" high e, .055" low e at the 14th, I see a higher percentage of gibsons than prs that can hit that without requiring me to do fretwork, and almost 0% from almost all other brands. Prs seems to run about 40% on that, gibson more like 60%. So if you like low clean action, consider that.
 

spguitar

Active member
My #1 since 2003. Its a 2001 model with a JB in the bridge. I sold my Les Paul Standard after I got it and never looked back.

2003
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2018
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godgrinder

Member
From what I understood according to the PRS book, they were more influenced by Juniors and Specials than actual LP's.

Also the scale length, body thickness and finish are all different so I don't even think it's really a LP subsitute.
 

Emg77

Active member
I agree with most here in regards to PRS singlecuts. Most of the ones I've owned just didn't have that Les Paul grind and Tone. But, I have owned 2 PRS Singlecuts that were outstanding. One being the one I currently own its a 2001 Pre lawsuit singlecut that is just fat and toneful! Plays outstanding too. Even with the fat neck. The second being a Tremonti Singlecut that I still lust after! So, they are out there. But in my experience few.

With all being said I've had some dud LP'S as well. But, when you get a good one! It's on! Right now that good one for me is 2016 Standard! The best one I've ever had or played. That's going up other standards and few customs as well. I've actually had some really outstanding earlier classics as well.
 
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Donnie B.

Well-known member
Hey, Dave Grissom makes anything I say about PRS completely mute.
Him and others prove they are as good a guitars as anything out there.
I just could never bond - and I tried numerous times over the years.
 
I took 15 years off from PRS (old name). Got a McCarty 594 last year with the low wind pickups, pretty f'in good. Les Pauls have not come out of cases since-got Heritages that do however.
 

jdel77

Active member
PRS are better for higher gain metal for me. They’re tighter and not so pushed in the low end like a Les Paul can be.

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I have these ‘87, ‘88 and ‘89 that I use into my VH4S, SLO or ‘85 Boogie Mark for modern metal. They’re tuned to B standard Drop A and Eb standard drop C#.

I do love my ‘03 Custom Authentic ‘68 Reissue LP Custom for alternative metal and rock and I’m hunting another Gibson now to have an alternative to that. Probably a nice SG Standard.

PRS are precision instruments. Gibson’s are a bit looser and random. Both have their place 👍
 

Beyond Black

Well-known member
From what I understood according to the PRS book, they were more influenced by Juniors and Specials than actual LP's.

Also the scale length, body thickness and finish are all different so I don't even think it's really a LP subsitute.
Agreed. Similar in body shape only. They really don’t sound or feel similar at all.
 
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